April 10, 2014

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Community Member Serves as Editor of Recent Book on Adult Learning

From the Community

Aging & Society Knowledge Community member Professor Barry Golding has recently served as Co-Editor of Men Learning through Life, now published by the National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (NIACE) in the UK. Dr. Golding has submitted to present his research at Aging and Society: the Fourth Interdisciplinary Conference, to be held this November in Manchester, UK.

The book, "seeks to identify and summarise what can be said about policy, practice and research into men’s learning in the international context. It also identifies examples of good policies or practices in men’s learning that can be shared in the international arena."

For more information, please visit this website.

To learn more about the Aging & Society Community, also a Common Ground Publishing knowledge community, please visit its website.

April 4, 2014

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New York Tackles the Pre-school Gap

bbc.co.uk | Original Article | by Sean Coughlan

New York's richest are going to have to pay for some of New York's youngest, under new Mayor Bill de Blasio's flagship plan for more pre-school places.

The proposed tax on those earning above $500,000 (£307,000) would provide free, full-day pre-school classes for every four-year-old.

It's the latest in a wave of expansions of pre-school education running across the United States.

President Barack Obama hailed the importance in his state of the union address last week, welcoming that 30 states were raising funds for more pre-school places.

"Research shows that one of the best investments we can make in a child's life is high-quality early education," said President Obama. Read More...

Image Courtesy of CD416MN (CC by 3.0)

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April 4, 2014

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Now Available: Collected Essays on Learning and Assessment in the Digital World

TheLearner.com | Bookstore | by James Paul Gee

Collected Essays on Learning and Assessment in the Digital World brings together some of James Paul Gee’s most important papers on learning. Gee has argued for a view of learning that integrates digital media, embodied experiences in the world, language, and collaborative activities that encourage collective intelligence. While he has argued that good video games incorporate cutting-edge approaches to learning and teaching, he argues, as well, that games need to be part of larger learning systems that network them with forms of collaborative interactions and other learning tools and activities. These papers also relate deep learning to new conceptions of educational equity and opportunity to learn, and news ways of thinking about collective action and design in the digital age.

This book is currently available in our bookstore.

March 28, 2014

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Fulbrights will ‘Extend Reach’

theaustralian.com.au | Original Article | by John Ross

Charles Darwin University boasts Australia’s highest proportion of interstate students, most of them learning online. The obvious next step is overseas, says Peter Kell, who heads CDU’s school of education.

“We’re looking to extend so that we develop an Asia-Pacific feel,” said Professor Kell, one of six Australian researchers to receive senior Fulbright scholarships this year.

The scholarship will fund Professor Kell to spend the first half of 2015 at the University of Illinois (Champaign-Urbana), which has partnered CDU in a collaborative online Master of Education that CDU introduced this year.

Champaign-Urbana has received a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation grant to develop e-learning, he said. “It’s a way of looking at leading practice in the world.” Read More...

Image Courtesy of Stephen Barnett (CC BY 2.0); Edited by Jessica Hajek

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March 20, 2014

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The Story Behind the SAT Overhaul

NYTimes | Original Article | by Todd Balf

In July 2012, a few months before he was to officially take over as president of the College Board, David Coleman invited Les Perelman, then a director of writing at M.I.T., to come meet with him in Lower Manhattan. Of the many things the College Board does — take part in research, develop education policy, create curriculums — it is perhaps most recognized as the organization that administers the SAT, and Perelman was one of the exam’s harshest and most relentless critics. Since 2005, when the College Board added an essay to the SAT (raising the total possible score from 1,600 to 2,400), Perelman had been conducting research that highlighted what he believed were the inherent absurdities in how the essay questions were formulated and scored. His earliest findings showed that length, more than any other factor, correlated with a high score on the essay. Read More...

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March 7, 2014

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A Video that Shows Why Teachers are Going out of Their Minds

The Washington Post | Original Article | by valerie Strauss

The video below is not a parody. It shows Chicago Public School teachers in a professional development session that will make you understand why teachers are going out of their minds and to what extent administrators have infantilized teachers.

Here is the video’s description on YouTube:

"This presenter was one of several consultants flown in from California and the United Kingdom for the Chicago Public Schools’ Office of Strategic School Support Services’ special network. This is a professional development for teachers of Saturday ISAT [Illinois Standards Achievement Test] preparation classes." Read More...

Image Courtesy of stockimages / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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February 28, 2014

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Are Students With Learning Disabilities Poorly-Served In College?

educationnews.org | Original Article | by Alexandria Suarez

Tens of thousands of college students are keeping their learning disabilities a secret. While 94 percent of high school students with learning disabilities receive help, only 17 percent of learning disabled college students do. Colleges and universities across the country are now focusing more attention and resources on helping these reluctant students disclose their conditions before they suffer academically.

“Many students (with learning disabilities) first get to college and really want to do it on their own,” says Sarah Williams, an East Carolina University professor of special education who is helping North Carolina’s public universities better handle learning disabilities. “They’re really tired of the whole system.” Read More...

Image Courtesy of potowizard / FreeDigitalPhotos.com

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February 21, 2014

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Early Learning: This Is Not a Test

huffingtonpost.com | Original Article | by Randi Weingarten and Nancy Carlsson-Paige

Early childhood education is "in" these days--from the bipartisan bill introduced in Congress this week modeled on President Obama's proposal to expand high-quality early learning experiences, to Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio's proposal to provide universal prekindergarten to every 4-year-old in New York City, to the Oklahoma model that provides access to high-quality preschool to all 4-year-olds in the state and extra support for younger children from low-income families. Democrats and Republicans, from retired generals to Hillary Rodham Clinton and her Too Small to Fail initiative, are touting the benefits.

It's right and overdue to make early childhood education a priority in this country. The United States ranked 24th among 45 nations surveyed for availability and quality of early childhood education. But as we move toward the goal of universal access to pre-K, we have to do it right.  Read More...

Image Courtesy of Naypong / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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February 10, 2014

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Education Spending Balloons, but Students in Some States Get More Money than Others

The Washington Post | Original Article | by Reid Wilson

There is disagreement within education circles over whether spending more money per pupil leads to better results. But there is no disagreement that the amount of money states spend on education has erupted in recent years.

In almost every state, the amount of money spent per pupil has more than doubled in the last 40 years, according to a new report. States spent an average of $4,221 per student in the 1969-1970 school year, in 2010 dollars. That number jumped to $10,643 in the 2009-2010 school year. Read More...

Image Courtesy of Sonicyouth86 (CC by SA 3.0)

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January 31, 2014

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How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

wired.com | Original Article | by Joshua Davis

José Urbina López Primary School sits next to a dump just across the US border in Mexico. The school serves residents of Matamoros, a dusty, sunbaked city of 489,000 that is a flash point in the war on drugs. There are regular shoot-outs, and it’s not uncommon for locals to find bodies scattered in the street in the morning. To get to the school, students walk along a white dirt road that parallels a fetid canal. On a recent morning there was a 1940s-era tractor, a decaying boat in a ditch, and a herd of goats nibbling gray strands of grass. A cinder-block barrier separates the school from a wasteland—the far end of which is a mound of trash that grew so big, it was finally closed down. On most days, a rotten smell drifts through the cement-walled classrooms. Some people here call the school un lugar de castigo—“a place of punishment.” Read More...

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